Alerts

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IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT FRAUDULENT UNEMPLOYMENT CLAIMS

Fraudulent unemployment claims are on the rise in Illinois. Many of you, your staff, and your co-workers have had fraudulent unemployment claims filed using their identities, including names and social security numbers. If you receive a fraudulent Illinois Department of Employment Security (IDES) claim or debit card in your name, we recommend notifying your human resources officer immediately and following these steps from the IDES:

  • IMPORTANT — If you receive a debit card, do NOT use this debit card!
  • Employees should report the fraud though this IDES link:
    https://www2.illinois.gov/ides/Pages/Report-Identity-Theft.aspx
  • If an employee submits this form, the employee does not need to call IDES to report the fraud. At this time, IDES has not created an online form for employers to report fraudulent unemployment claims.

IDES FAQs

What happens after I report the identity theft to IDES?

If you submit the report of identity theft through this page, the associated claim will be shut down. If you need to call, please recognize that IDES is working through all calls placed to the agency. Please be patient in waiting for a callback. IDES systems sometimes generate multiple correspondence; if you receive IDES correspondence, keep them, as they provide useful information for the IDES representative during your callback. In most instances of fraud, IDES’ integrity measures stop the unemployment claim and prevent payments from being made before hearing from you.

If someone steals my identity and IDES pays benefits to the fraudster, am I responsible for paying back the money?

No. You will not need to pay back the money. Your employer won’t have to repay it either.

If someone steals my identity and uses my information to apply for unemployment benefits, can I still apply for benefits if I need to?

Yes. We’ll be able to distinguish your legitimate claim from a fraudulent one.

What if I reported the fraud but still received a letter stating that I must pay back an overpayment?

If you received a notice or letter from us saying you owe us money, we sent this notice of overpayment in error if you recently reported fraud, or have not applied for or received unemployment benefits recently. We're so sorry for the anxiety this must have caused, and we want to reassure you that you do not owe any money as a result of a fraudulent claim. If you are a victim of fraud, you can ignore the overpayment notice. Our unemployment benefits computer system sends overpayment letters automatically when people really do need to repay benefits. Due to the massive number of fraudulent claims filed recently, the computer system sent many of these letters in error before we could stop them. We’re sorry you accidentally received one.

Will any funds paid on the fraudulent claim in my name be reported to the IRS as income?

No. Fraudulent funds are not reported as income to the IRS, and you will not receive a 1099 form from IDES if you report the fraud.


After you report to IDES that you were the victim of identity theft, go to the Federal Trade Commission and take these immediate steps to protect yourself from further acts of fraud.



To:
Chief Executive Officer (also of interest to Security Officer)
Subject:
Consumer Alert
Summary:
E-mails fraudulently claiming to be from the FDIC are attempting to get recipients to click on a link, which may ask them to provide sensitive personal information. These e-mails falsely indicate that FDIC deposit insurance is suspended until the requested customer information is provided.
Distribution:
FDIC-Supervised Banks (Commercial and Savings)
Note:
Paper copies of FDIC Special Alerts may be obtained through the FDIC's Public Information Center, 877-275-3342 or 703-562-2200.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports from consumers who received an e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC. The e-mail informs the recipient that "in cooperation with the Department of Homeland Security, federal, state and local governments…" the FDIC has withdrawn deposit insurance from the recipient's account "due to account activity that violates the Patriot Act." It further states deposit insurance will remain suspended until identity and account information can be verified using a system called "IDVerify." If consumers go to the link provided in the e-mail, it is suspected they will be asked for personal or confidential information, or malicious software may be loaded onto the recipient's computer.

This e-mail is fraudulent. It was not sent by the FDIC. It is an attempt to obtain personal information from consumers. Financial institutions and consumers should NOT access the link provided within the body of the e-mail and should NOT under any circumstances provide any personal information through this media.

The FDIC is attempting to identify the source of the e-mails and disrupt the transmission. Until this is achieved, consumers are asked to report any similar attempts to obtain this information to the FDIC by sending information to alert@fdic.gov.

For your reference, FDIC Special Alerts may be accessed from the FDIC's website. To learn how to automatically receive FDIC Special Alerts through e-mail, please visit the FDIC's website.


Sandra L. Thompson, Director
FDIC: Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection